Category Archives: Fiction

From Board Gaming to Lovecraft and Beyond, Pt. 2

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“But I called, as we came near, to one who stood beside the water’s edge, asking him what men did in Astahahn and what their merchandise was, and with whom they traded. He said, ‘Here we have fettered and manacled Time, who would otherwise slay the gods.’ I asked him what gods they worshipped in that city, and he said, ‘All those gods whom Time has not yet slain.'” — “Idle Days on the River Yann,” Lord Dunsany

In case you missed it, click here for Pt. 1 in which I trace the path I followed through board games to Lovecraft fandom. This week, we’re going to follow that rabbit hole a little deeper. Continue reading

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[REVIEW] The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug

desolation-of-smaugI interrupt my regularly scheduled post this week to offer a spoiler light review of The Desolation of Smaug. As always, the opinions below are solely my own. If you had a mainly positive experience with the film, more power to you. You just might want to stop reading now. Continue reading

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From Board Gaming to Lovecraft and Beyond, Pt. 1

“The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents. We live on a placid island of ignorance in the midst of black seas of infinity, and it was not meant that we should voyage far. The sciences, each straining in its own direction, have hitherto harmed us little; but some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the deadly light into the peace and safety of a new dark age.” — “The Call of Cthulhu,” H.P. Lovecraft Continue reading

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[REVIEW] ‘The King Raven Trilogy’ by Stephen Lawhead

King Raven AudioStephen Lawhead just might have been my favorite author during my teen years. I found his unique blend of mythic fantasy and historical fiction enthralling. Probably best known for his Pendragon Cycle, an original presentation of the Arthurian mythos, much of his writing is grounded in the history and mythology of the British isles that he moved to Oxford to study. Continue reading

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Expectations

If my first post here wasn’t indication enough, I tend to be overly serious. Some might even say I verge on somber. Such is the curse of the reflective introvert: through joy and despair, fun and chore, all must be analyzed and deconstructed. However, I’m hoping this blog will allow me to loosen my collar and slip into something a little less…gloomy. If my normal demeanor is a severe, black, three-piece business suit, perhaps my online presence can be more severe, black business casual (with sweater vest and sleeves rolled up, no doubt). Don’t get me wrong; I certainly reserve the freedom to indulge in heavy personal or philosophical meandering whenever the mood strikes, but I’d like to mitigate the melancholy by also writing about subjects toward which I feel an emotion akin to what normal human beings might identify as “excitement.” Continue reading

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